ZoomDoc

ZoomDoc is a private on-demand GP app which provides patients access to GPs 24/7 through paid-for face-to-face home visits, telephone and online Skype-style consultation. Their website claims: ‘ZoomDoc was born out of a desire to remove as many of the barriers between doctors and patients. Providing professional, exceptional and accessible care for all of our patients.’

The company was incorporated and registered with the Care Quality Commission on 14 April 2015, with the following Founding team:

  • Dr Kenny Livingstone- Founder and Ceo, Clinical Lead- registered manager/director

  • Eugene Kouumdjieff- Co-founder and Head of Product

  • Hal Livingstone. Founder and Legal Advisor

  • Matt Hagger Co-Founder and Advisor Growth Strategy USA

  • Paul Landau Non Executive Director and Strategy Consultant

Alongside shares held by individuals, there are also shares held by the following companies; E-Man Asset Management Ltd, Halken Properties Ltd and Seedrs Ltd.

They have net assets of £46.19k as of April 2017 according to their company profile on Endole Suite. Their turnover is unreported and their cash in the bank is reported at £39.79k .

The company held a crowdfunding campaign on the website Seedrs and reached an investment of £540,695 as a way to further develop the app’s services and its area coverage as it so far only covers London.

ZoomDoc has had a total funding figure of £689.1k through two funding rounds, according to Crunchbase. This came from an initial £150k investment from CEO and Founder, Dr Kenny Livingstone and £539.1k from Seedrs in the form of Equity Crowdfunding.

British tennis star Andy Murray made an undisclosed investment into the company through the Seedrs crowdfunding page, along with around 275 other investors.

As of January 2018, Seedrs show that ZoomDoc investment raised now stands at £540,695, the equity offered is 19.99% and the pre-money valuation is £2,001,544.

Register Number: 09540794

It is a private on-demand GP app which provides patients access to GPs 24/7 through paid-for face-to-face home visits, telephone and online Skype-style consultations. Includes private referrals, letters, plus dispensed medication. Aims to remove as many of the barriers between GPs and patients.

GPs can sign up to the app for free, register themselves as ‘on call’ and specify how long they want to be available for and how far they would travel for home calls. The app launched in March 2017 and has around 300 GPs on its books, all of which are fully qualified NHS working GPs. By the end of 2017 there were 5,000 downloads of the app and 2,000 registered users, receiving 5-star ratings on Facebook and the Appstore.

ZoomDoc has yet to procure any major NHS contracts, but the services aim is to bid for out-of-hours contracts from CCGs across the country.

A CQC investigation into the service, published in April 2018, found that the service ‘provided responsive, caring and well-led services in accordance with the relevant regulations. However, service was not providing safe and effective services in some areas in accordance with the relevant regulations.’

The summary of concerns were as follows:

Are services safe? - We found the service was not providing a safe service in some areas in accordance with the relevant regulations.

  • The provider did not ensure proper and safe management of medicines including the doctors’ bag.

  • The protocol for prescribing did not include the clear guidance for visiting GPs regarding the safe prescribing of off-licence medicines and some other medicines.

  • Infection control audits had not been carried out.

  • Arrangements were in place to check evidence of parental responsibility where an adult was consenting to treatment on behalf of a child, but this was not documented in the child notes after consultations.

  • Arrangements were in place to safeguard people, including arrangements to check patient identity during face-to-face consultations.

  • There were enough GPs to meet the demands on the service.

Are services effective? - We found the service was not providing an effective service in some areas in accordance with the relevant regulations.

  • There was some evidence of quality improvement activity.

  • The provider had not provided clear clinical evidence based guidance to prescribe longer prescriptions of benzodiazepines, the oral contraceptive pill and hormone replacement therapy which could lead to large quantities being prescribed without further investigation.

  • All GPs had attended role-specific training in safeguarding of vulnerable adults, safeguarding children level three and basic life support. However, the provider was unable to provide evidence that all GPs had received formal training in infection control, health and safety, information governance and the Mental Capacity Act.

Our use of cookies / millipedia :: ethical digital